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as it seems? erika miller takes a closer look at the data and what it says about the u.s. economy. >> reporter: 3-tenths of a percent does not seem like much. but, when it comes to the nation's unemployment rate, a 3- tenths of a percent drop is actually staggering. the unemployment rate now stands at 7.8 percent. that's the lowest level since january 2009, when president obama took office. even more remarkable is the reason for the drop. >> the unemployment rate decline was not because people dropped out of the labor force. to the contrary. the labor force actually but the household survey estimate of employment increased even more. >> reporter: the household survey shows total employment rose by 873,000. that's the biggest gain since ronald reagan was president. but there's a catch. two-thirds of those jobs are part-time positions, taken because no full-time work was available. and there's another troubling sign: >> what we have is hiring that is concentrated, most recently, in the government sector. hiring that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of posi
're in a very slow economy. so i think that in this particular third-quarter earnings period the chance of a good surprise, a meaningful good surprise or a meaningful disappointment, it's pretty low. the street expects poor earnings comparison. that is what we're going to get. whether you are a couple percent decline or a couple percent gain. it's really not that much different. so it's looking ahead. remember earnings are a trailing indicator. >> so are we going to get a surprise or a disappointment you think from alcoa. everybody looks at this as setting the tone for trading as you mentioned. it will be the first dow component to report. it also when you look at the company, it has businesses in autos, aerospace, packaging, construction, so it is kind of a bellwether for the economy. what will those alcoa earnings tell us. >> well, alcoa reports first all the time, obviously. and i don't think that is a good idea to use that as a bellwether for earnings. think of the sector that alcoa is in. materials are going to have some was comparisons, really, energy and materials are going to be
's helping the economy make a comeback. a "set back" for stocks, on investor jitters about the global economy. the major averages are now in negative territory for october. is this a buying opportunity or time to take profits? and toyota, once known for quality, announces yet another major recall. does this make toyota less popular with consumers? that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! the nation's housing market appears to be building a new foundation. that's according to the latest snapshot of the u.s. economy released today by the federal reserve. the so-called "beige book" compiles data from 12 fed districts, and it shows residential real estate improved in "all" districts in september. anecdotes from business contacts and economists noted existing home sales strengthened, while prices rose or stayed stable. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at whether the broader economy is also showing signs of strength. >> reporter: here's a shocker: the u.s. economy is growing, but only at modest pace. that's what anecdotes, not hard numbers, from the fed's regional banks suggest about the business climat
what one expert thinks. >> susie: american consumers are feeling pretty good about the economy. the university of michigan's latest reading on consumer sentiment hit a five-year high. that comes as the treasury reports the u.s. budget deficit topped $1 trillion in fiscal 2012. that's our fourth-largest budget deficit since world war two. that held wall street's gains in check: the dow rose 2.5 points, the nasdaq fell five. the s&p down four. for the week, the major averages were all off more than 2%. the nasdaq was hit the worst, down almost 3%. giov >> i think it's very hard to predict real estate prices now because the world is in such an unusual situation. there are so many ifs. and because we just recovered from the biggest housing bubble in u.s. history. so we're really in uncharted territory right now. >> reporter: shiller says one problem for the housing market is there is really no sense of urgency for potential home buyers to pull the trigger on a purchase. interest rates are expected to remain low for the foreseeable future and housing prices really aren't rising that
is the first dow component to report earnings, and is considered a bellwether of how the economy is faring. the stock barely budged in the regular session, closing at $9.13 a share, and was up a few pennies after hours. we're happy to have with us now alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld. >> welcome back to nightly business report. baseed on how alcoa did in the third quarter, how do you think business will be for you for the rest of this year and going into 2013? >> well, it's a miktsed word out there. there's a lot of volatility. we see in the end markets that we confirm, the aluminum market is going to be about growth six percent. we took is down a notch from seven percent. as you just said, this is a decade where aluminum demand has doubled. there's high growth also here in the u.s. and we've seen that in the aerospace industry, very, very nice. we're seeing it in the u.s. automotive segment, very nice, and then there are on the other side -- i mean, coming down. we've seen the heavy truck segment coming down substantially, pretty much in the u.s., and building and constructions on the commerc
offered the latest look into the u.s. economy, and the latest fuel for the fight over economic policy in the presidential campaign. it was the kind of news that president obama hoped for, just over a month before the election and two days after a sub-par debate outing. >> more americans entered the work force, more people are getting jobs. >> brown: indeed, september's unemployment rate, calculated by a survey of households, fell to 7.8%. that's the lowest since the president took office. a second survey, of businesses, showed that employers added a net of 114,000 jobs, and job gains for july and august were revised upward by 86,000 the president touted the numbers in a campaign stop at george mason university in fairfax, virginia. >> now, every month reminds us that we've still got too many of our friends and neighbors who are looking for work. there are too many middle class families that are still struggling to pay the bills. they were struggling long before the crisis hit. but today's news certainly is not an excuse to try to talk down the economy to score a few political points.
mend a devastated europe after the second world war. but it's now the economy that has the e.u. facing one of its biggest crises yet. mounting debts, high unemployment, and austerity measures have triggered protests in some euro-zone nations. the economic woes have created deep rifts among countries using the joint currency, and raised questions about maintaining the euro and even their union. germany is the e.u.'s economic powerhouse. its chancellor, angela merkel, said the nobel peace prize shows the value of european unification. >> ( translated ): the euro is more than a currency because in the end it is foremost about the original idea, the idea of europe as a community of peace and values. >> suarez: but there were detractors, including those who said the e.u. hasn't dealt with an influx of immigrants. the director of amnesty international's branch that monitors the e.u. said he hopes the award would encourage the european union to be more open to refugees. >> suarez: the $1.2 million prize will be awarded in oslo on december 10. for a closer look at its successes and some of the
it the economy tax. it's been crushing. >> question. why did president obama seem thrown off balance? did he underestimate governor romney, pat buchanan? >> he certainly d. governor romney performed better on substance than any candidate in any presidential debate in history. reagan would have beaten him in style in 1980 but on substance i've never seen anybody better prepared than governor romney. he was on of fence. the real question, why did barack obama, the president, do so badly. john, he didn't come prepared for what he found there. he seemed difident, almost disinterested, sour. when they had the two pictures together he was looking down at his notes and the governor was talking to him as if he was lecturing him. some say he's lost his enthusiasm for the battle. he looked like he was weary of the job. i think it may have been something to do with him having been out on the road for a year saying the same thing. he didn't seem to be intellectually stimulated. >> do you think he's overstating that? >> i think mitt romney far exceeded expectations. he turned in a bothow performance. i t
to be in a situation unless the economy picks up very dramatically and there are absolutely no signs that california is going to come to boom any time soon. then, what you are dealing with here is basically a state budget that is anywhere between 10% and 15% out of whack. that the revenues are 10% to 15% below their spending commitments. and that's going to be very, very painful. you're going to see it in a lot of things. but you know, there's -- on the other hand, and there is always another hand in politics, if he's successful and gets this thing passed, he also runs the risk of kind of a volatility. he's basically betting the state's future on a handful, basically, 150,000 california taxpayers, out of 38 million people, that they are going to do well enough to raise all this money that he thinks he's going have coming from this ballot measure. that's a little bit scary, too, particularly because it guarantees local governments $5 billion a year for realignment. a constitutional spending commitment on a temporary tax. that's kind of uncertain, as well. >> belva: we have so many hot issues, we have
, this time between joe biden and paul ryan. the vice-presidential candidates will slug it out on the economy, medicare and taxes. they may be number two on the ticket, but these men hope they can make this another crucial turning point in an election that is now almost a dead heat. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: vice-presidential debates are often more entertaining than important, but not this time. joe biden will be trying to beat back the romney bump from the first presidential debate; and paul ryan will be working to stretch mitt romney's debate double into a home run. >> if ryan does really, really well, it could possibly fundamentally make this a real horse race, not just nationally but in the battleground states. so, i think there is a lot of expectation on both sides for what this debate possible could do. >> reporter: if you thought the first presidential debate was bogged down in statistics and policy details, you'll have more fun tonight. debate veterans are expecting fireworks. jeff nesbit was press secretary for former vice-president dan quayle. >> while both of them can go d
next week. and he hammered away on the economy. >> my whole passion is about helping the american people who are struggling right now. that's what this is about. the president says he's for middle class. how've they done under his presidency? not so well. i want to help the middle class get good jobs and better take- home pay. i know how to do that. >> sreenivasan: romney also underscored his anti-abortion stance after saying tuesday that he would not pursue abortion- related measures if he's elected. today, he told reporters, "i'll be a pro-life president." meanwhile, president obama spent the day at the white house. in an interview with radio host tom joyner, he said he's not surprised by the tightening polls. >> governor romney kept on making mistakes month after month so it made it looked artificially like this was, might end up being a cakewalk. but we understood internally that it never would be. that it was going to tight, it tightened over the last three or four days, but it could have tightened after the convention if they hadn't had such a bad convention. >> sreenivasan:
issues as you see them in the hispanic community for this election? >> jobs and the economy is the number one issue. immigration, like we said, is the issue that moves the latino vote. >> what's the unemployment -- >> inspires them to vote. unemployment rate among latinos is 10.2%. >> it's been about 11% during the obama's presidency. but for latinos, the symbolic issue is immigration or else it's personal. it's not like an abstract issue. it's personal. either we are immigrants or we know someone who's an immigrant or we work with someone or our neighbor's an immigrant. it's not abstract. it's very personal. >> why do so many anglos seem to resent hispanic immigrants more than they do others? >> i think that there's a couple of things there. i think that there's a certain feel of because there's the community that's growing so fast, they're sort of like a threat that our way of life is going to change and i don't think that they see immigrants as part of america. and, you know, the funny thing is the majority of hispanic -- well, all hispanic voters are u.s. citizens of course. why do th
on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who plunged penn state university into scandal by his sexual abuse of young boys over many years was sentenced today. the judge called his crime a "story of betrayal." jerry sandusky wore a red jail jump suit and a smile as he entered the center county courthouse this morning, less than two hours later, the smile was gone after the 68-year-old learned he will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. lead prosecutor. >> i believe that the sentence that the court imposed today was a wise and proper one and that it reflectedded the se
jobs and the economy. now we've had a u.s. ambassador murdered in libya. there's been general... much more attention to foreign policy. i think we had good jobs numbers as well. remember that. >> warner: last friday. the romney campaign is looking to go where the ducks are. at this moment the economic numbers are good for the white house but there's more and more controversy about foreign policy and leadership. >> warner: what would you add to that, susan? did they see this as an opportunity to be seized? >> i think the romney camp understands he needs to be seen as a credible commander in chief if he's going to be elected president. there's a bar he needs to get over. i don't think they're going to stick on this issue much it's pretty clear that even though foreign policy has risen a bit and even though there was an opening because of the white house's changing explanation of the attacks in benghazi that killed our ambassador that this election is going to be prosecuted on the economy. that is the topic that i think we will turn back to for most of the remaining weeks of the campaign
be left alone for other reasons and the economy would be hurt, turkey has been on a ten-year growth pattern and nobody wants that kind of a conflict that could end turkey's phenomenal growth. so a variety of reasons turkey doesn't want full blown conflict with syria. what i see mostly in the next few months is the new normal which is that every time assad picks a fight with turkey, shelling turkish territory, turkey will act in kind and reciprocate. now that we see turkey has shelled syria in return for syria shelling turkish cities, the question is what if there's an incident in which, accidental as it might, be the syrians end up shelling at one more turkish town because some of the shelling is not precise and the syrians are not known for their master of the artillery targeting and if there's another shelling that creates a large number of casualties, turkey would have to respond with a larger force. so i could see the conflict escalate bug the turks don't want it to get to the next level unless they know that the united states and nato support them. >> pelley: well soner cagapta
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)